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Sample A
Examination of the dried fibres and particulate material that comprised sample A
showed it to consist of a mass of man-made synthetic and natural fibres with some
feathers, a few hairs and a relatively low level of sediment and particulate material
and some fragments of insect-like material (Figures 1 and 2).  It was noted however,
that there were some very distinctive black and white hairs present in the sample
(Figure 3).
The majority of the fibres found in the sample were considered likely to have
originated from the carpet and other textiles.  The few hairs present in the sample
were considered to be mainly human with some cat, although some may have
originated from textiles.  The feathers in the sample did not appear to be flight
feathers and were therefore considered most likely to have originated from stuffing in
pillows, cushions, furniture, etc.  
The sediment and particulate material found in the sample was not particularly
distinctive in either particle size distribution or general appearance.  The few
fragments of insect-like material found were identified as fragments of arthropod
exoskeleton and were considered likely to have originated from a woodlouse.  There
was not enough of the material to identify the species of woodlouse.  However,
there are numerous common species that on the whole appear to feed on different
types of vegetable matter.
The black and white fibres shown in Figure 3 were mammalian in origin but were not
identified further.  It was however, considered likely that they had been dyed.
Sample B
Examination of the dried fibres and particulate material that comprised sample B
showed it to contain a high level of human and animal hair; cat and possibly rodent,
sand grains and finer sediment (Figure 4) and arthropod/insect remains (Figures 5
and 6) and very fine-grained mud-like sediment that dried to form a hard layer (Figure
7).  All of the above was considered consistent with the usage of the room
described earlier.  A larva found in the sample (Figure 8) was submitted to a
consultant entomologist for examination, identification and comment.  They reported
as follows:
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